Our Algeria, for sisters by sisters

Informations about Algeria


1 Comment

A muhajirah homeschooling in Algeria

dz2

Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullah,

Sister Emma shares with us her experience of hijrah and homeschooling in Algeria. She also runs her own charity organisation, assisting children and families in Algeria since 2007. If you want to find out how you can help, please visit her website >>> http://www.algerianaction.co.uk/ and may Allah accept it from her and the brothers and sisters involved in this project!

_________________________________

Where are you from and how long have you been in Algeria?

I moved to Algeria in August 2013,  from that time i have needed to spend a few months in the UK for health reasons but, that is when I made hijrah alhamdulillah.

Please tell us how your life and your family life has changed since you moved to Algeria.

Living in Algeria has increased our appreciation for the most basic of things – like having a constant supply of running water we also waste less. In the UK I tended to look after paperwork type things but here these things are done by my husband, I think through necessity I have become more dependant on my husband.  Alhamdulillah we already lived relatively simply in the UK but here our lifestyle has become much simpler.  Continue reading

Advertisements


Leave a comment

‘Eid-ul-Adha in Algeria

k1

Picture from Twitter @hijraenalgerie4

What I am sharing here is my experience of ‘Eid-ul-Adha in Algeria but of course it could be the same in any other Muslim country, maybe with just few differences.

I have always spent ‘Eid-ul-Adha in Europe and the first time I have experienced it in Algeria, I have really understood the ‘meaning’ of that particular ‘Eid; nothing to do with the one I was used to spend in a non-Muslim enviroment.  Continue reading


Leave a comment

Hijra en Algérie : la découverte d’un pays fabuleux

hijra-en-algérie

Hijra en Algérie: la découverte d’un pays fabuleux Il n’y a pas si longtemps que cela, un frère m’a mis en relation avec un « 3ammi » (un ancien de l’ancien) qui possède une fabuleuse entreprise en Algérie. Son rôle ? Il vend des formations à distance concernant les moteurs diesel, les moteurs essence, … Lire la suite


1 Comment

“I felt like a stranger” – interview with a muhajirah from Algiers

dz

We have had the pleasure of chatting with sister Um Youssef, an italian revert from Naples who moved to Algiers in 2013. This is our little interview with her…

What have been the difficulties at the beginning of your ‘adventure’ in Algeria?

At the beginning I felt very lonely, my husband wasn’t with me and I have to admit that I have felt a strong loneliness. I am not talking about loneliness because of friends to talk to but because I felt as if I wasn’t ‘part’ of that world. It was very hard, I felt like a fish out of water. Other little things were the language, the food and the habits completely different from mine. I had to adapt to whatever was available, from every point of view alhamdulillah but this hasn’t been a big issue. The Algerian mentality was different from mine but I am not talking about kindness or good manners, absolutely, but the fact of being in a country completely different from the one I had been for the past 10 years, the UK, a country that evolves really quickly. However, I would say that the biggest difficulty has been the loneliness and alhamdulillah I have learnt what ‘being alone with Allah’ really means.

And the positive things ma shaa Allah?  Continue reading


1 Comment

Finally on the move


The plan was that my husband would drive to Algeria a week ahead of me and the children, who would then fly there to join up with him.  Meanwhile another man put in an offer for the house, with a view to adding it to his list of properties to rent out.  So it looked like we had sold it after all alhamdulilah.  The night before my husband left, Sarah, my daughter, and I were packing the last few things and we could hear all the voices and accents from the living room next door where the brothers who lived locally had come to say goodbye to my husband.  There were, of course, Algerian accents, but also, Nigerian, Pakistani, Chechen, English (an “Essex boy” and a Cockney mashallah!!!!) and Kenyan.  They were all so sad to see my husband go as they looked on him as a real brother and there were tears.  My husband felt like he was deserting them and was really sad.  To this day he left a little piece of his heart with these brothers. Continue reading