Our Algeria, for sisters by sisters

Informations about Algeria


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A ‘taste’ of Hijrah

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As salam alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

“Algeria mon amour”…………. Algeria a love that never dies.

Year after year, spending time there, knowing people, growing in the din, my love for Algeria has started to grow bigger and bigger and  now I can definitely say that I feel at home, my home, my dar al Islam.

This summer I left England with the hope in my heart that my hijrah could start but Allah had decreed that the time was not yet alhamdulillah.  Continue reading


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“There is always khayr in Algeria” – sister Um Mohamed from Algiers

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[An interview with Um Mohammed, an Algerian sister who made hijrah to Algeria after living in Europe for many years. May Allah preserve her and her family, amin!]

Where are you from and where do you live now?

I am from Algiers and I live in Algeria.  Continue reading


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The desert as our background

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When you leave for holidays, you take with you only what is necessary… but later  you realise how many useless things you have, you understand you could live with much less.

When you live in a place where poverty is a reality, you don’t throw away anything because you could easily give it away without fear of offending anyone… and you realise how we are used to pride, arrogance and waste.

When you are among people who, one by one, leave for the call of prayer, who praise and thank Allah despite their problems, your faith grows and you do your best to improve, with the help of Allah… and you realise how often you are lazy and complain about silly things.  Continue reading


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Finally on the move


The plan was that my husband would drive to Algeria a week ahead of me and the children, who would then fly there to join up with him.  Meanwhile another man put in an offer for the house, with a view to adding it to his list of properties to rent out.  So it looked like we had sold it after all alhamdulilah.  The night before my husband left, Sarah, my daughter, and I were packing the last few things and we could hear all the voices and accents from the living room next door where the brothers who lived locally had come to say goodbye to my husband.  There were, of course, Algerian accents, but also, Nigerian, Pakistani, Chechen, English (an “Essex boy” and a Cockney mashallah!!!!) and Kenyan.  They were all so sad to see my husband go as they looked on him as a real brother and there were tears.  My husband felt like he was deserting them and was really sad.  To this day he left a little piece of his heart with these brothers. Continue reading